REAL ESTATE

How to Invest in Real Estate While Working 9-5


If real estate investing was easy, everyone would be doing it! The truth is that, despite the financial freedom and flexibility it offers, investing is hard work. And it’s even more difficult if you’re working a full-time job or raising a family. But with good time management and a little sacrifice, you can do it!

Welcome back to another Rookie Reply! In today’s episode, we talk about the challenges of juggling a nine-to-five job and investing. We also discuss some of the most important documents you need when creating lease agreements or inheriting tenants. Are BAD neighbors causing headaches and scaring away your best tenants? We have several solutions to this problem—including one that will help you avoid the issue before you commit to buying a rental property: ordering a property survey and setting boundaries!

Ashley:
This is Real Estate rookie episode 413. We have some great questions today. We get into some legal items you will want to know about when tenants are in place. You’ve probably heard about one of them, but one is new to Tony and I. My name’s Ashley Care and I’m here with Tony j Robinson.

Tony:
And welcome to the Real Estate Rookie Podcast where every week, three times a week, we bring you the inspiration, motivation, and stories you need to hear to kickstart your investing journey. And today we’re going to get into various boundaries, both for your physical property and your neighbors who might be harassing your tenants. We’ll talk about how to balance being a real estate investor with working a full-time job when you kind of feel like giving up, which leads us into this week’s first question for our rookie reply.

Ashley:
Okay, today’s first question is from the real estate rookie Facebook group, and one of the members said, how do you single people handle the workload of real estate investing and having a full-time? W2. I’m a solo woman warrior, living in a large city, holding down a full-time job and a couple part-time jobs. I’m pretty productive and motivated, but it’s just overwhelming all the time. Finding the property, talking to the contractors, picking the materials for the rehab, the budget, et cetera. I feel like giving up help a girl out, any advice or inspiration would be greatly appreciated. Okay, so Tony, when you were back in the day single, how would you have compared your workload from today? Married with a family, having to juggle a W2 part-time jobs and wanting to start in real estate investing?

Tony:
I don’t think your marital status really has a big influence here, whether you’re single, whether you’re married, whether you have kids, whether you have no kids, whether you’re retired, whatever it is, everyone’s juggling something. And a lot of people who are looking to get into the world of real estate investing, most of us do have full-time jobs and we’re juggling community and family and all these other things. So I think the first answer that comes to mind for me is that this is just part of the grind. This is what it takes to kind of be successful. When I was still working my W2 job, I was working 40, 50, 60 hours a week at the W2, and then I was getting up at four o’clock in the morning to work on real estate beforehand. When we first started the podcast or when I first came on the podcast, I still had a job and I was recording before work. So it’s like you go a solution per se, and we can talk about time management and things like that, but I just think we’ve got to accept that that’s the grind that’s necessary to get that first deal, that next deal, that second deal, that third deal done.

Ashley:
Yeah. One book that I would suggest reading is that Buy Back your Time. So this is a great book and I think we’ve had other people on the podcast talk about it where time management is a huge thing and what are some things that you can do to outsource little tasks, tests that you can get rid of, different things to do in your life to have better time management. As far as the single part, I agree with Tony that getting invested into real estate, I mean there’s people who are married that the person they’re married to has no involvement at all in the real estate and they’re still going out and making it happen. If anything, I feel like you may have more time available to do that without having kids, without having a significant other to go out and have to go on dates.
Not to say that that’s dreaded, but there is that time commitment to being in a relationship also. So if you are thinking of I don’t have that other person to help me balance things, go out and find a partner. Find a partner who’s just as motivated as you who you can trust, and it doesn’t have to be your significant other. It can be just another person interested in getting started in real estate or maybe somebody who’s already gotten started and can kind of teach you the ropes and help you along with you bringing some value to. But Steve Rosenberg, who we’ve had on the podcast before, and he’s also been on the Rookie Bootcamp almost every single time, and he talks a lot about time management where he has you do a time study. So really sit down and for the next two weeks, write down everything you do.
So when you wake up, how long is it taking you to brush your teeth, take a shower, your morning routine? What do you do next? Do you drive to work? How long has that, what do you do when you get to work? Are you filling out forms? Are you doing construction? Whatever it is, break out your whole day. How long are you watching Netflix? How long are you scrolling on Instagram? And it says here that she has a full-time job plus a couple part-time jobs. So what I would look at is are you willing to sacrifice a little bit now maybe giving up one of those part-time jobs and not making that additional income right now to take that time to actually research and analyze and find deals to get started in real estate. Because I think that’s a huge challenge for some people is having to give up income now for that long-term gain.
And I saw it with one of my partners. He has stayed with his job that he’s had, and he’s kind of taking over the company of that because that right now is money now instead of transitioning into real estate. But you can see the burn and the toll that’s taking on him. His body isn’t physically going to be able to do this task forever that he’s doing, but it’s such a, it’s great income right now. So think about that cost benefit as to giving up something, making that sacrifice for that long-term play of getting started in real estate and being able to build that portion of your life that you want.

Tony:
Yeah, I think a lot of it just comes down to sacrifice. Ashley, I couldn’t agree with you more. Like if investing in real estate and building wealthy through real estate was easy, then everybody would be doing it. But it does take a certain level of sacrifice to make that happen. And I’ve met a lot of people who talk about their desire to want to invest in real estate, but when rubber meets the road and it’s time to buckle down and take action, they let everything else kind of be a reason as to why they can’t do it. So anonymous member from the real estate rookie Facebook group, just know you’re not alone. It’s a feeling that a lot of people have experienced, but you keep pushing like Ashley said, and that payoff should come assuming you’re doing all the right things,

Ashley:
Find that community so you don’t feel so alone in it, and you get excited about meeting up with people, going out for coffee and talking real estate and finding deals together too. That’s a great way because even though I was married, I had kids, I had a family when I was getting started in real estate, I was so lonely. I had no friends that were getting into real estate. I had nobody to help me, nothing, even though I had a partner, he knew nothing about real estate and was just passive. So building some kind of community around you, whether it’s online or in person, is definitely helpful to keep you motivated and to keep you wanting to grind.

Tony:
On that note, Ash, every single rookie that’s listening, if you haven’t been to BP Con yet, you 1000% need to come 2000 investors there. You’re going to find your tribe, you’re going to find some people you connect with. And being in that kind of environment and that kind of room where there’s so many other people who have already done what it is you’re trying to accomplish, it inspires you in a way that that’s hard to even put to words. So if you’re a new investor, you haven’t come out to BEP Con yet, make sure you make that trip out. And if you want attend BEP Con, just head over to biggerpockets.com/events. You’ll find all the information to register for this year’s BP Con.

Ashley:
We’re going to take a short break, but coming up we’re going to learn what a lean prohibition is and why does that matter for you as a landlord. Also, what can you do when inheriting tenants? So stick around and we’ll get into that right after this quick break. Okay, welcome back everyone. We just covered how to find the time and do a time study that I hope you guys are all starting this week and how to make real estate work for you. We’re going to be getting into inheriting tenants when you purchase a property and what is a lien prohibition? So our next question is from Troy s, when buying a tenant occupied rental, is there a specific form that current tenants can sign to confirm the amount of the security deposit held by the current landlord? And clarification of ownership of properties, existing appliances, I would like to make sure there’s not potential discrepancies after I take ownership, an existing tenant decides to move out. So Tony, yes, there is. Yes, there is. And how do you spell it, Tony, because I know you learned it.

Tony:
E-S-T-O-P-P-E-L estoppel. It took me a while to figure that one out when I heard it the first time. I feel like we’ve been talking about the estoppel a lot in recent episodes, but it’s good to hear that people are asking about it because it must mean that people are closing on deals and they they’re getting some properties with tenants in them. So Ash, break it down for the folks just like me, what is an estoppel agreement? How do you use it? What is it important for?

Ashley:
Well, I think even before that there’s two documents you need to see before you do an estoppel agreement. And the first one is if you’re buying off the MLS, you’re doing an agent, they most likely had to fill out a wrench rider form. This would be with your purchase contract included in that would show what unit it is, the tenant’s name, how much they’re paying in rent, how much their security deposit is, if there are appliances, who owns them, who pays what utilities. So this should be provided to you and you can get ahold of this before you even put an offer in on the property. Your agent should be able to get this for you. So you’re going to look at the information on that. You’re also going to request a copy of the lease agreements for the tenants in place. Okay, so first you’re going to match those two, make sure they’re correct.
You’re also going to look at the dates and see if the lease is valid or month to month, whatever that is. Next, you can do an estoppel agreement where you send it to the tenants. I would get the current owner’s permission to do this first, and you’re going to send it out and it’s just going to be a questionnaire for them to fill out. You can write a little letter with it and say, hi, I am so-and-so I’m purchasing the property, blah, blah, blah. Then you’re going to want to know their name. You’re going to want to know what they pay in rent if they have a lease agreement in place, even if you have a physical copy. I still like to ask to see what their viewpoint is on it, what repairs need to be made in the property, and then the utilities, who pays what utilities, how much did they pay in a security deposit?
When was the last time they paid rent? Is their rent current? So I go through as many questions as I can, and if you just google a stoppel agreement, you can find samples. We also have a copy in the real Estate Rookie bootcamp that you can get ahold of, but this is just a great form to match what the owner is saying, and this becomes a huge benefit when there aren’t actually written lease agreements in place where it’s just an oral agreement between the landlord and the tenant and you’re just taking the word for it. You can also get the tenant’s word with this estoppel agreement. Then if there are discrepancies, this is where you settle those discrepancies before you close on the property because after you close on the property, it’s a lot harder to solve these where you can use it as a negotiating tactic during closing to actually figure out how much did they actually pay in their security deposit, which you should be getting on their closing statement too. So having an estoppel agreement is great when you are inheriting tenants to get that information, but also their contact information, and this is also a great way for you to give them your contact information so they know how to contact you once you take ownership and also submit maintenance requests and then more importantly, how to pay their rent once you’ve taken ownership of the property.

Tony:
We talked about this last time as well, Ash, but what happens when there’s a disagreement between what the seller says the lease contains and what the current tenant says the lease contains? How do you handle that kind of discrepancy?

Ashley:
The first thing is go buy the lease. They both sign the lease. The lease is correct no matter what they say. So go with the lease agreement. You have a legal document that is your ally. If they’re both saying something different, ask if either one of them has proof. So if one is saying their security deposit was this, the other one is saying that ask if they have anything signed. They have a receipt from the landlord saying this was their security deposit. Maybe the landlord has a copy of his bank statement with the canceled check or whatever that shows how much they paid, something like that. So that’s where I would take it to the next step. Ask for proof in New York state, we have to use attorneys to do closing. So that kind of works in my benefit where I have an attorney now basically negotiating saying that the information isn’t matching and figuring it out before we actually close on the property.
So our next thing, Tony and I both didn’t know what this was and this is a lien prohibition notice. So this question is from Brandon Lily. Has anyone ever experienced electing to file a lien prohibition notice? I had a conversation with my attorney about it. It essentially negates the possibility of a lien being placed on the property if a tenant hires a contractor to do work and doesn’t pay. So Tony, did your mind kind of start to think like, what if I have a short-term rental gas that staying for a week and decides to have a contractor come and hook up a hot tub on the property or something and they just don’t pay ’em?

Tony:
It definitely gets the gears turning. It definitely gets the gears turning. Right. And just to recap for the rookies, right, because Ash and I, before we started recording, we were trying to make sense of this or this question to make sure that we were tracking here. So basically what Brandon’s asking is say that you’re the landlord or let’s use a real example. Say that Ashley has a property. I move into Ashley’s property as a tenant. I sign a 12 month lease and during those 12 months I hire someone to come out and fix the deck and I do this without Ashley’s knowledge. I just do it on my own and I end up not paying that contractor for the work they completed on the property. That contractor can now file a lien against Ashley’s property to where if I refinance, if I sell, if I do any of that stuff, that contract get first.
Now obviously it’s unfair to Ashley because she didn’t even know that this repair was happening. She didn’t authorize the work, but me as the person living there, I almost like to act on her behalf. So this lien prohibition notice, it’s something that will get added into your lease agreement that states if the tenant completes any work, the owner can’t be held liable for that person not paying. So it’s a way to protect yourself as the owner from I guess a tenant who just likes to get a lot of free work done, maybe negatively impacting your property. So Ash, obviously you got a lot of long-term. What do you feel like you got to go add this back in now? What are your thoughts?

Ashley:
Yeah, I mean I actually think this is something great that Florida offers so that your tenants can’t go out because really what’s stopping my tenants from going out and hiring something besides what it says in the lease agreement, but even then after they do hire someone, they don’t pay. I’m obviously going to have to pay legal fees to enforce my lease that I’m not responsible and there shouldn’t be a lien on my property. So I think that this is a tool that maybe more states should adopt because in our lease agreement it specifically states, and I think this is common with most residential tenants, is that the landlord is responsible for repairs and maintenance, so you should be reporting those to the landlord and any that leasehold improvements to the property, like if they want to go and remodel the property themselves, that specifically states any work that is done in there needs approval from the landlord before you can begin.
And that’s where the process would go to. We’ve never actually had any tenant want to do that, but the process would go into making sure the contractor is insured, things like that. We did have one tenant that wanted to put new flooring in and she said, if you want to split the cost of the flooring with me, my son works here, he’s going to install the flooring. And she had been somebody we’d known and had as a tenant for a long time and we actually did that with her. He installed the floor for free and we split the cost of the flooring with her and the maintenance guy just went and looked at the flooring after he was done and everything was great. It was fabulous, and we wouldn’t do that with every tenant, but that situation ended up working out fine for us. I guess to wrap up that question, just make sure your lease agreement specifically states that your tenants can’t hire contractors to come in and do the repairs on the property unless they have prior approval from you as the owner to actually do that.

Tony:
So guys, if you’re watching this on YouTube and you have any experience with this lean prohibition notice or prohibition of lean notice, drop in the comments and let us know what your thoughts are because we’d love to get some insights from someone who’s maybe used this in the real world.

Ashley:
Okay, up next we’re going to be talking about what is the purpose of a survey when purchasing a property and also a problem with neighbors harassing tenants, we will share our opinions about a situation that is plaguing a member of our rookie Facebook group. Welcome back to Round Out our show. Today we will share our opinions about a situation that is plaguing a member of our rookie Facebook group and why a survey is a good idea when purchasing a property. So this question was posted, anonymous and details are omitted because of active litigation. Ooh, this is a juicy one, Tony. Here’s my dilemma. I have a home in an excellent area for growth. It easily rents and has attracted good tenants. The past two years we’ve had it. The problem has been the neighbors. They incessantly hound my tenants. They are mad. We turned the house into a rental.
They’ve called the city on the property numerous times and the city never finds wrongdoing. Once when the city came out, they actually found the neighbor who complained in violation of an ordinance. These neighbors also think they own certain parking spots on a public street. They’ve called the police on the parking situation. The police just keep driving because there is no violation. They harp on my good tenants for no reason. One of them has filed a frivolous lawsuit about something that would be considered a city issue that has been cleared by the city. Yet we have spent thousands in attorney fees defending ourselves with every claim being met with no evidence and no wrongdoing on our part. The individuals have been told not to bother our tenants, but continue to toe the line just enough that it can’t quite be considered harassment by the police. So they are getting away with it and driving my tenants away.
The tenants are not renewing because of the nasty neighbors. We don’t want to further litigation and the police department can’t do much. I don’t feel like I can ethically continue to rent this property because I don’t want to put my tenants through the nonsense these neighbors like to do. I think I know what needs to be done in this scenario, but I would like to hear the opinion of experience investors. You got to know your neighbors. That’s always been a fear of mine if I ever moved as to who’s going to be my neighbor, can we get along or what have, because you hear so many horror stories of not getting along with your neighbor and that is the worst. I feel like you have to be next to him every day.

Tony:
I think it’s also crazy with our short term, we get flack from some neighbors because people don’t like the constant traffic, but we’re talking about a long-term residential tenant who’s there for a year or whatever it may be. Like why would that bother someone? I think first I feel for you, anonymous real estate, rookie Facebook group member, it sucks that you said thousands of dollars on legal fees in a lot of single family rentals. That’s all your profit, right? They’re just going back into trying to protect yourself in a court law. Honestly, one of the first things I would do is I would look up ownership of that property next door and see the owners. If they are, then maybe your options are a little bit limited, but if they’re not and say that they might also be renting, maybe reach out to that landlord and see if you can buy the property. We had a similar issue in Joshua Tree where a tenant or a neighbor was giving our tenants a hard time. They literally had to call the cops on him, and we looked up the property and saw that it was owned by someone else and we reached out to that owner. We never heard back from him, but our goal was to try and buy that property and just move that person out. That was literally our game plan. I think that could be, who

Ashley:
Knew Tony had a vindictive size?

Tony:
You want

Ashley:
A coroll? So I guess

Tony:
What,

Ashley:
I own your house now. He’s your 30 day bonus notice you’re moving

Tony:
Out. Well, just to give context so people don’t hate me on YouTube. This guy, I had multiple guests call the cops on him because we had one, we had a same sex couple that was standing there and he was just hurling a bunch of really mean things there. I had an African American guest there and he was dropping all kinds of crazy racist things. He approached two of our guests late at night yelling at them and just really things that would make any person feel uncomfortable staying there. So we said, man, we got to do something. So we actually ended up building a bigger fence to the front yard to try and keep him out and keep ’em away. But that’s what I would try and do in the situation like, Hey, is there a way for you to get this person out? And if they’re renting also just buy the house.

Ashley:
And I joke about you, Tony, but that’s 100% something I would do, but you, you’re so much nicer than me. But in that scenario, but I think there’s a solution right there too, is building a bigger fence. Is there a way to block them out even more of that? It’s almost, they would have to go out of their way to contact the other tenants and what are the rules? And maybe this is a case where you’re in the city, you can only have a fence so high or whatever. Well, that’s where you go and you get a permit for a variance. Then you explain the situation that is going on between you and the other person that lives next door that maybe the city would allow it to be higher because of all the wasted resources in the police department of being called out to take care of these things.
So that could definitely be an option, but I think maybe what the situation you’re hinting at is selling the property, and I feel like that’s just giving up. But that might be the thing that makes most sense for you if you’re not making any money on the property, and it’s awful that it’s not because of the tenants, it’s not because the property itself, it’s because of the neighbors and if you put new tenants in place, there’s the scary situation that this is just going to happen again and again and you’re just going to keep having to pay legal fees and not even just the money that’s being wasted on this, but also this has got to be something that keeps him up at night thinking about this and having to deal with this. I think about the time commitment of having to be the mom between these two kids that are fighting. So I think that the time commitment on that too is definitely a headache in itself.

Tony:
Yeah. Ash, what do you think about trying to have a conversation with the person, this neighbor?

Ashley:
I don’t think that I would be the one to go and have the conversation. I would 100% send to Daryl because he is a lot more charming and a lot more of a people person and understanding and gets along with so many other people. But yeah, I think that’s also a great, I guess to find out what is their motive, what is so wrong with the people living next door and get their exact viewpoint instead of hearing it through your tenants and through the police officers and stuff like that too.

Tony:
Yeah, we do usually try and get phone numbers for our neighbors when we move in, when we open up a new property. And sometimes they’re nice, sometimes they’re not so nice. But yeah, I guess if you feel like it’s safe for you to do that and you feel like you can have that conversation, it might be worthwhile. But yeah, it is a tough situation to be in and the fact that they’re kind of toeing the line know where that gray area is to operate, it does make it a little difficult for you. I don’t know. I wonder, Ash, can you file the restraining order on a neighbor? Could that even work, right? Someone who’s so close to you, I don’t know. I’d see if maybe there’s a way for you to legally prevent them from filing some of these frivolous lawsuits because like Ashley said, that’s a waste of resources at the police department, at the local courthouse, at wherever it may be. So I just wonder what other options you might have legally to prevent this person from continuing to do this to your tenants.

Ashley:
Yeah, and I think one thing too, with having the conversation with them, maybe you can find out what the real issue is and offer some kind of solution or see that maybe it actually is the tenants that are doing something and they’re just a, we sneakier about doing it. So maybe even setting up exterior cameras, things like that too, you could go on. But it’s also how much time, money, and effort do you want to put into trying to create a resolution instead of maybe, I don’t know when you bought this property, but maybe you actually could make pretty great money on it right now, selling it you at a good time. You can sell it for a lot, but I would definitely try some options before you actually go and give up to well enough. With stalking, harassing, we’re moving on to a survey. So a survey is what shows you the parcel of land that you own and what the boundary lines are and how many acres or square footage you have on the property. It’ll often show where the buildings are located, maybe where a creek is, where the driveway is, things like that. So Jason Dorsey’s question is when purchasing a property, what’s the purpose of getting a survey? The realtor is asking if I’m going to get one. Tony, do you get a survey for every property you purchase?

Tony:
We’ve actually only done surveys on the bigger kind of commercial properties that we’re looking at purchasing. So like the property we’re looking at in Big Bear, we got a survey done for that one. The property we disclosed on in Utah, we got a survey done for that one. I’ve actually never done it for any of my single family homes. Usually the boundary lines are pretty well defined, but for the bigger commercial properties where we’ve used it. What about for you, Ash? I mean, just in general, a lot of the stuff you buy is on acreage, right? So it might be a little bit less clear on where the property lines are.

Ashley:
Even for in the city too, I always get a survey done and usually it’s at the seller’s expense. The seller is paying the survey once in a while as part of my, if I know maybe the seller doesn’t have a lot of cash upfront or something and they’re looking at the bottom line as to how much cash will be in their pocket, I’ll offer to pay the survey as part of my purchase package. But I will also accept an affidavit of no change. So if they have an existing survey that wasn’t from 50 years ago was fairly recent, as long as they signed an affidavit that there was no changes to the survey, the parcel, the boundary lines, I will take their existing survey. So I’ll often use that too as a negotiation technique to, and put that in my offer that they don’t have to pay for a survey. I’ll accept an existing one.

Tony:
And Ash, for people that aren’t maybe super familiar with what a survey is, what is it and what do you feel are the benefits of getting one

Ashley:
So you know exactly where your boundary lines are, so you’re not getting in disputes with your neighbors at all, but also to show what you own. But we actually had a survey issue before where when purchasing a property, there actually was a neighbor using part of the property because they thought that that was their property and it actually wasn’t. And when we had the survey redone, we actually had to delay closing to make it clear that yes, this was part of the parcel. There’s also been issues before where the survey didn’t match up the deed description of the property too. And that’s kind of delayed closing on a property too, because those are errors. On my primary residence, there was a issue, we got a survey done when we built our house, and then when we went to refinance, there was actually an issue on the survey and we had to have our survey redone. So that took a little while too. So there always can be different issues that come up, but when you’re purchasing a property, I like to get the survey because you have it, even though there could be issues later on, but you at least have something. And I think that the title company likes to have the survey too, but I’m not sure about that. I think that,

Tony:
Yeah. Let’s break down one of those issues actually. So you said that you were looking at buying a property in the neighborhood built on the land that you were looking to purchase. How do you rectify that? Do you tear it down to amend the property line, they have to buy it from you? What do you do to navigate around that? Well, they

Ashley:
Weren’t building on the land. It was a rental property. It was a triplex we were buying, and I think they had a shed on the property or something that was there, and they ended up having to move the shed and we had to, I don’t know if they had their attorney or what. That’s another nice thing about having attorneys is they kind of handle all of this and you don’t really see behind the scenes at all. But they had to move the shed, and we didn’t close until it was clearly defined what our parcel was, and they had to, I don’t know if they even tried to fight it or what, but if whoever showed proof that obviously they ended up agreeing and they moved their shed onto their property line. And I think one thing too with surveys too is if you’re buying a property with a fence that has neighbors as to who owns the fence, also trees, is the tree on your side?
Is it on their side? What does the survey show? Because the surveyor will come and stake the corners of the property for you too. So you know where your personal lines are, which is really nice to have too, especially if you’re buying acreage as to exactly where it starts and ends. But trees, if a tree falls on the neighbor’s property, but the tree is actually on your property, if the tree was dead and you neglected it and you didn’t take care of it, you could be liable for paying for any of the damages. So knowing which trees kind of belong to you and what ones you actually have to maintain too is a good thing to

Tony:
Know. We just unlocked a new fear for all of our rookie investors, the falling tree across the property line.

Ashley:
When we built our house, we built it in a field, and I did feel this sense of relief like, oh, if it’s windy or superstorm, and we never have to worry about a tree falling on. But also I remember saying, oh, we need to get gutters on the house. How come we didn’t do that when we built? Dave was like, what’s going to go in the gutters? There’s no trees, there’s no leaves or the gutter cap or whatever on them to block it. He’s like, there’s nothing goes in the gutters except the rate. You don’t have to put the gutter caps on. So those are our questions today. If you have a question that you would love to submit, you can go to biggerpockets.com/reply. You can also go to the real estate rookie Facebook group and leave a question there. Make sure you guys are joined in with the rookie community because a lot of these questions are already answered by the amazing community on the Facebook page. So make sure you go there and check it out. If you’re watching on YouTube, please like this video and make sure to subscribe. If you’re listening on your favorite podcast platform, we’d love for you to leave us an honest rating and review and to follow along so you get notified of the new upcoming episodes. I’m Ashley. And he’s Tony. Thank you guys so much for listening and we’ll see you next time.

Tony:
This BiggerPockets podcast is produced by Daniel Zarate, edited by Exodus Media Copywriting by Calico Content.

Ashley:
I’m Ashley. He’s Tony, and you have been listening to Real Estate Rookie.

Tony:
And if you want your questions answered on the show, go to biggerpockets.com/reply.

 

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